Dec 29, 2001

I want to raise my mizzen boom for comfort, Bimini, and windvane clearance.

Since I'm going to raise the boom and not the mast, I would like to know the minimum height to clear the Cape Horn. Bert have you negotiated a deep discount yet?

I haven't looked at the gooseneck to see what it'll take to do the job. Any suggestions?

I'm going to take the sail in for cleaning, shortening and installing full length battens? Any suggestions.

 

Dec 29, 2001

I seem to remember something in past messages to the group about the mizzen height as it relates to bimini's, wind vanes etc. I recall someone saying (Paul I think) that raising the boom (while easy enough) affects performance in a negative way. If you're listening, Bert, how did you raise your mizzenmast? (a new one or a raised step??). Since I'm also planning to install a cape horn (in the near future) I'm in a quandary as to how to handle the mizzen problem. I haven't yet gone to 1/4 mizzen stays so will do the whole project at the same time. I'm like you, Howard, sure could use a discount on the wind vane...

Dec 29, 2001 8:22pm

Mizzen Boom

A previous owner raised Voyager's mizzen boom. It's about 6 feet off the cockpit sole now, which is ideal for a short person like me. They simply unbolted the gooseneck and tapped new holes a bit higher. No doubt they cut the sail down, though the sail is so old it's hard to tell how and where. A new one is on order.

I put an old Sail-O-Mat vane on last winter. The vane itself, when installed, sticks up REALLY high. It's impossible to tack without removing the vane blade. That's not too much of a problem since I rarely tack at sea. But, in case of an accidental gibe I'd hate to take out the vane so always rig a preventer, a 3/8 nylon line permanently attached to the boom bail. Generally I run that thru a snatch block on the genoa track, then to a cleat near the sheet winches.

A previous owner also installed what friends here call a sissy bar - really, a sort of mizzen boom gallows. It's a piece of 1 inch stainless pipe hose clamped to the pushpit and bent in a square U shape. I rarely drop the mizzen on to it, but the thing makes working over the side so much easier. Our mizzen booms stick out aft of the stern a lot. I can hang on the sissy bar and get to the end of the boom easily. Well, pretty easily. It's a little harder each year! The peril of this is not furling the sail properly, and having it chafe the bar. The last owner must have been pretty careless as there's quite a repair at that point on the sail.

Winter has attacked Baltimore with low temps. Living aboard is cold, though an electric heater and a temporary propane one makes life below pretty reasonable. An electric blanket and 50,000 BTU girlfriend help as well.

We all obviously have a lot of cool things to show off to each other at the GAM. I can't wait! What an opportunity to take a lot of photos for the web site!

Dec 29, 2001

Howard and all: I raised the mizzen boom by 14" (by raising the mast with a 10" piece of the original extrusion plus a 4" pedestal), and that clears the Cape Horn without problem, but not much more to spare, so that I would park the boom on the side (see below vang/preventer arrangement) when the sail is furled, just in case it hangs a bit loose. If you can't raise that much for some reason, say only by x = 10-13", speak with Yves Gelinas @ mail@capehorn.com, who has our measurements and can advise the maximum reduction advisable from my 14" rise. If you have to unhook the vane to tack, that is easy to do on the CH with one 4-thread butterfly screw hanging on a small line.

Back to Mizzen Boom preventer, I have a reef leachline longer than necessary, so that even in its extended, full sail position, down the leach, around the block, then along the boom to a cleat on the boom above the wheel, it has enough spare length to serve as a vang and preventer by cleating the free end on the cleat aft of the primary winch. That is a most useful arrangement, whether to park the boom or when underway to tune the sail as a vang, or as a preventer, easy to undo from the wheel or the cockpit for tacking or any purpose, no need for extra hardware or line.

I note Jack's Simpy Stick for my (fast) declining years... although I only reach out there to tie up the sail cover end, and I could resolve that with a permanet loop or U-fitting closer to the mast.

===========

We raised the mizzen boom twenty years ago. It was just too low. I found that the masts had been made by Metalmast Marine in Connecticut. They had a section for the mizzen mast that they sold me along with some pieces to fit inside the splice to make a bolted splice. I took them to a local spar shop. Instead they made a welded splice to the bottom of the mizzen mast that lengthened the mast 18 inches. This gave plenty of clearance for my head (6'1""), but the boom was so high that attaching the halyard and furling the sail were problems. The mizzen sail was the normal size. So I moved the gooseneck down 6 inches, with the boom 1 foot higher than stock, and all worked out OK. When I replaced the mizzen sail later, it was made with an additional 6" on the hoist. I was never able to notice any difference in sailing by changing the height of the boom or the size of the sail. I think Metalmast is still in business. The spliced section of mast is not anodized, so I have covered the bottom of the mast, below the compass mount with fancy rope work.

I have an Aries Vane. When I installed the vane, I positioned it so it fit under the mizzen boom. The mount is sturdy, so it can be used as a step to get to the end of the mizzen boom if necessary. I

understand Aries vanes are now manufactured in Denmark.

 

 

Dec 30, 2001

I was told 4 years ago by Metalmast Marine that the extrusion 10" length they had just sent me was the last of their stock. Since that was enough for my needs, I did not ask them if there could be other sources for that extrusion or any other reasonably compatible.

 

December 29, 2001

I seem to remember something in past messages to the group about the mizzen height as it relates to bimini's, wind vanes etc. I recall someone saying (Paul I think) that raising the boom (while easy enough) affects performance in a negative way. If you're listening, Bert, how did you raise your mizzenmast? (a new one or a raised step??). Since I'm also planning to install a cape horn (in the near future) I'm in a quandary as to how to handle the mizzen problem. I haven't yet gone to 1/4 mizzen stays so will do the whole project at the same time. I'm like you, Howard, sure could use a discount on the wind vane...

 

Jan 5, 2002

I talked with Yves at Cape Horn and he said that the windvane needed twenty-four inches of clearance above the stern rail. When I took my measurements yesterday, I found the rail to be sixteen inches above the top edge of the transom and the bottom of the mizzen boom was sixteen inches above that and sixty inches above the cockpit. Since I wanted six feet of headroom to allow me to stand under a Bimini, that means raising the boom twelve inches. This also gives me twenty-eight inches above the rail so everything should work out well.

My specific confusion, as opposed to my general state of confusion, is that Bert said he had to raise his boom fourteen inches and it was still close to the vane. is there any enlightenment out there.

 

1319 Jan 6, 2002

Dear Howard: Sorry if I caused confusion, but the 4-6" clearance is what I call small, meaning you have to watch the length of the topping lift when you bring down the sail under way (as for reefing, so the angle of the reefing band on the sail may be relevant), and that your furled sail may hang that much when stowed quickly at sea, so you have to make sure that it is kept on the side (as I do with the extra length of the reefing line cleated on the genoa sheet cleat). But I did not say I am unhappy with my situation, I am very happy, and could do with a smaller clearance!

If Metalmast, CT does not have anymore of the original extrusion (as they told me in sending my piece 4 years ago), they may direct you to another source of similar extrusion that may be ovalised to end up close enough, as long as their internal circumference are equal, so you can fit a substantial insert. 12" seems a bit too much for a pedestal, althoug it could be made too.

Soryy again if I confused you, Kind Regards and all the best. Bert dF 80K

1343 Jan 13, 2002

Generally the 8 - 11 inches rule works for raising the mizzen boom. The gooseneck is simple... drill and tap the gooseneck slide into the mast track.

Full length mizzen battens are very good... I like them on my boat and the extra roach seems to get back the lost sail area quite well. I am even considering shortening the boom, raising the mizzen mast on a pedestal and going high aspect ratio.... any comments?

Paul

 

December 29, 2001

 

Howard and all,

A previous owner raised Voyager's mizzen boom. It's about 6 feet off the cockpit sole now, which is ideal for a short person like me. They simply unbolted the gooseneck and tapped new holes a bit higher. No doubt they cut the sail down, though the sail is so old it's hard to tell how and where. A new one is on order.

I put an old Sail-O-Mat vane on last winter. The vane itself, when installed, sticks up REALLY high. It's impossible to tack without removing the vane blade. That's not too much of a problem since I rarely tack at sea. But, in case of an accidental gibe I'd hate to take out the vane so always rig a preventer, a 3/8 nylon line permanently attached to the boom bail. Generally I run that thru a snatch block on the genoa track, then to a cleat near the sheet winches.

A previous owner also installed what friends here call a sissy bar - really, a sort of mizzen boom gallows. It's a piece of 1 inch stainless pipe hose clamped to the pushpit and bent in a square U shape. I rarely drop the mizzen on to it, but the thing makes working over the side so much easier. Our mizzen booms stick out aft of the stern a lot. I can hang on the sissy bar and get to the end of the boom easily. Well, pretty easily. It's a little harder each year! The peril of this is not furling the sail properly, and having it chafe the bar. The last owner must have been pretty careless as there's quite a repair at that point on the sail.

Winter has attacked Baltimore with low temps. Living aboard is cold, though an electric heater and a temporary propane one makes life below pretty reasonable. An electric blanket and 50,000 BTU girlfriend help as well.

Jack, 057K Voyager

 

 

 

1343 Jan 13, 2002

Generally the 8 - 11 inches rule works for raising the mizzen boom. The gooseneck is simple... drill and tap the gooseneck slide into the mast track.

Full length mizzen battens are very good... I like them on my boat and the extra roach seems to get back the lost sail area quite well. I am even considering shortening the boom, raising the mizzen mast on a pedestal and going high aspect ratio.... any comments?

Paul